‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ at The Irish Repertory Theatre

John Keating, James Russell, Úna Clancy, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

(L to R): John Keating, James Russell, Úna Clancy in Irish Rep’s ‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

What do William Butler Yeats, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, AE, George Bernard Shaw, George Moore and Katharine Tynan have in common? Their initials are carved on a tree growing on the property of Coole Park, Gort, in County Galway, the estate Lady Gregory inherited after the death of her husband Sir William Henry Gregory.

That is just one of the tidbits told by the spirit of Lady Gregory (1852-1932) who inhabits the production Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory currently at the Irish Repertory Theatre until the 22nd of March. Written by Lady Augusta Gregory with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly and directed by Ciarán O’Reilly, the delightful production reveals the life and times of one of the venerable, wry-humored progenitors of the Irish Literary Revival and co- founder of The Irish Literary Theatre and the Abbey Theatre with William Butler Yeats and Edward Martyn.

Úna Clancy, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

Úna Clancy, , Irish Rep’s ‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory, with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

The production stars Úna Clancy as the lively and candid Lady Gregory who fills out another role in Lady Gregory’s play  “McDonough’s Wife at the end of Act II. James Russell portrays a variety of roles and is the humorous Mike McInerney in Lady Gregory’s, “Workhouse Ward” and the Sheep shearer in “McDonough’s Wife.” Russell is erudite and reserved in his portrayal of the philosophical literary genius, poet, playwright William Butler Yeats. And he is the kindly, avuncular Sir William Gregory who was Lady Gregory’s senior by thirty-five years.

We learn they had a son Robert, the pride of their lives whose death Robert mystically foreshadowed in a dream which his cousin also mysteriously had. He died during WWI in a play crash in a death which his mother like any devoted mother never could reconcile easily. Sir William Gregory attempted to practice noblesse oblige for the suffering Irish people under his care at a time when it was least appreciated. And his actions Lady Gregory implies were mischaracterized and reshaped to satisfy another agenda.

Úna Clancy, Terry Donnelly, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

(L to R): Terry Donnelly, Úna Clancy, , Irish Rep’s ‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory, with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

Terry Donnelly of the lyrical voice, spot-on authenticity and versatility portrays Anne Horniman friend of the literary lights who helped fund the Irish National Theatre Society. Terry Donnelly also portrays Mary Sheridan, Lady Gregory’s influential, native-speaking Irish nanny who teaches her about the history and folklore of the area. Donnelly constantly surprises with her characterizations as Honor Donohoe in Gregory’s “Workhouse Ward,” and portrayals of Widow Quin, the Narrator, Marian and the character of the Hag 1 in “McDonough’s Wife.”

John Keating, , Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

John Keating, Irish Rep’s Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

John Keating rounds out this exceptional ensemble with versatility and humor portraying notaries Wilfred Blunt, Edward Martyn, John Quinn, George Bernard Shaw and Sean O’Casey. He is hysterical and nuanced as Michael Miskell the down-and-out companion of Mike McInerney who wheedles McInerney to remain in impoverishment when he might have stayed with his well-off sister Honor Donohoe (Terry Donnelly). And he is the poignant and raging McDonough who returns from his journeys to discover that the townspeople have eschewed his wife as an “outsider.” Their rejection is particularly loathsome because she dies in childbirth and no one in the xenophobic community wishes to join together to memorialize her passing or help bury her. Dark are Lady G’s themes of bigotry, alienation, shame and guilt in the revelatory “McDonough’s Wife.”

The personification of the Irish literary greats and the effect of their productions (the story of Synge’s Playboy of the Western World is particularly acute and ironic) is fascinating. Their discussions reveal the history of the period memorably with gusto. Gregory’s emblematic presence delivered with good will by Clancy makes the narrative of Lady Gregory’s life ring with truth.

John Keating, James Russell,, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

(L to R): John Keating, James Russell,, Irish Rep’s Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

This production is many things: a historical encomium, a mini-revival of Irish playwrights, an affirmation and revisiting of that vital Irish literary renaissance in the early twentieth century and beyond. Importantly, it is a celebration of a woman who accomplished much for Irish theater and cemented the connections between Ireland and the United States, something which Americans need to be reminded of.

The added material by O’Reilly with Lady Gregory’s own words from her autobiography and published journals and from insightful articles by professors and researchers into the amazing time, O’Reilly cobbles together thoughtfully and humorously. The actors enliven the true to life artists, but O’Reilly’s narrative spoken by Gregory with various quotes from real personages coheres dramatically so that the audience remains engaged.

Critically, O’Reilly adds the two productions written by Lady Gregory which reveal her breadth and scope from humorous dialogue and conflict in “The Workhouse,” (finely engendered by director and actors) to the reality of the isolation and xenophobia of the the community where “MDonough’s Wife” takes place. The drama of the latter reflective of the bigotry of isolated communities regarding anyone from another social spectrum i.e. their inability to embrace with Christian grace “the other” has currency for us today. Gregory hit upon a strain of the human condition that is pernicious and seems everpresent despite the hope of religion to expurgate it.

Úna Clancy, Terry Donnelly, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

(L to R): Terry Donnelly, Úna Clancy, , Irish Rep’s ‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory, with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

I thought the set was functional and symbolic; the dark green walls with nooks and crannies was where actors sat in character waiting to add their portrayals to the grand stew that was being created. Seamlessly, the set afforded them the opportunity to don costumes secreted there so that they could quickly step into the 22 roles the four actors portrayed with authenticity. The inclusion of the tree with the famous initials of Yeats, et. al and the music, lighting and sound effects added to the production’s appeal.

Clancy’s natural rapport with the audience is expertly directed and developed. The idea to incorporate Lady Gregory’s ritual practice of distributing a Barm Brack to her cast and the audience was fun. The cast distributed the Barm Brack (the delicious fruitcake was moister and less adamantine than the one my Irish-American aunt made) to us. It was a perfect treat after the humorous, ironic conclusion of “Workshouse Ward,” at the end of Act I.

Úna Clancy, John Keating, Irish Rep's Lady G: Playw and Whisperings of Lady Gregory, Ciarán O'Reilly

Úna Clancy, John Keatin in, Irish Rep’s ‘Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory’ by Lady Augusta Gregory with additional material by Ciarán O’Reilly, directed by Ciarán O’Reilly (Carol Rosegg)

This production is a gem and I do think that educationally it needs to find an audience because of its revelations and historical grist regarding Irish literary history. Above all it is a memorialization and celebration of Lady Gregory, her works, her amazing friends. And, if you like, you may consider taking a trip to the West Country of Ireland to visit Coole Park. There, you will still see the walled garden and “The Autograph Tree” with the initials of Sean O’Casey, William Butler Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, John Millington Synge, AE and others, and be able to imagine a time when these writers enjoyed a unique camaraderie and received sustenance for their souls in a little piece of heaven on earth.

Noted are the creative team: Charlie Corcoran (set design) David Toser (costume Design) Michael O’Connor (lighting design) M. Florian Staab (sound design).

Lady G: Plays and Whisperings of Lady Gregory runs with 1 intermission at the Irish Repertory Theatre’s W. Scott McLucas Studio Theatre (22nd St. between 6th and 7th) until 22nd March. For tickets and times CLICK HERE.

 

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About caroleditosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is an Entertainment Journalist, unpublished novelist, poet and playwright. Writing is my life. When I don't write I am desolate. Carole Di Tosti has over 1000 articles, reviews, and other writings online. Carole Di Tosti writes for Theater Pizzazz and other New York theater websites; Carole Di Tost free-lanced for VERVE and wrote for Technorati for 2 years until the site changed its focus and Blogcritics which is archived. Carole Di Tosti covers premiere film festivals in the NY area:: Tribeca FF, NYFF, DOC NY, Hamptons IFF, NYJewish FF. She also covers SXSW film.

Posted on February 25, 2020, in NYC Theater Reviews, Off Broadway and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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