‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock’ 2021 Athena Film Festival Review

Protestors came from all over, 'The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Protestors came from all over, ‘The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Protestors came from all over, 'The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Protestors came from all over, ‘The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
LaDonna Brave Bull Allard in 'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
LaDonna Brave Bull Allard in ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

End of The Line: Women of Standing Rock directed and produced by Shannon Kring, is an epic, historic film. Using cinema verite, on the ground style cinematography, Kring follows protest activities of the largest gathering of Indigenous Peoples in the US as they take a stand against the exploitation of their lands given to them in an agreed upon treaty of 1851 by representatives of the U.S. government. This is a film about the women of the Nakota, Dakota and Lakota tribes, who with their men and families, gathered together to stop the destruction of the Missouri River by an oil company, Energy Transfer Partners responsible for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
‘ End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

She focuses principally on grassroot activities of water protectors Wasté Win Young, Phyllis Young, Ladonna Brave Bull Allard, Pearl Daniel-Means, Linda Black Elk, Ph.D. and Madonna Thunder Hawk. As the movement grows and they gain the moxie as empowered women to forge ahead and take this fight to the world, we revel in the courage, stamina and bravery to fight the good fight until they reach the goal.

Colonial past, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Colonial past, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

The Dakota Access Pipeline is the 1,172-mile-long (1,886 km) underground oil pipeline in the United States. It begins in the shale oil fields of the Bakken formation in northwest North Dakota and continues through South Dakota and Iowa to an oil terminal near Patoka, Illinois. Together with the Energy Transfer Crude Oil Pipeline from Patoka to Nederland, Texas, it forms the Bakken system. Extraction of the oil depends on fracking, an extremely dangerous procedure to the environment. The entire fossil fuel process condemns the area land and water and increases global warming aka Climate Change aka known as extreme weather actions.

Ceremonial dancing, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Ceremonial dancing, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

Announced to the public in June 2014, the almost $4 billion dollar project took off after informational hearings for landowners ending in 2015 that did not include Native Americans who had rights to the land. Dakota Access, LLC, controlled by Energy Transfer Partners, started constructing the pipeline in June 2016. Other companies have minority interests in the pipeline. The pipeline, completed by April 2017 became commercially operational on June 1, 2017 under the Trump administration.

Ceremonial dancing, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Ceremonial dancing, End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

Kring focuses the documentary on the women of the Indigenous peoples between the time that the pipeline bulldozers showed up on Standing Rock Reservation until the time that protestors and activists were evicted and the camp pulled down. Also Kring covers the aftermath reflecting on the camp’s power to bring unity and the actions that the Indigenous Americans have undertaken afterward. She examines the strength, resilience, inner power and intelligence of Native American women who have their s*%t together to finally say “enough is enough.” Willing to die for the great purpose to keep the water in the Missouri River clean and unpolluted as it feeds into the water supply of 18 million Americans, the film shadows and highlights water protectors as they maintain their goals in the light of hypocrisy of the Army Corp of Engineers under the Obama Administration. The film also explores the actions of the women beyond the Trump administration.

Wasté Win Young, water protector in End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Wasté Win Young, water protector in End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ directed by Shannon Kring Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

When the standoff is concluded and arrests are made, the coalition of men and women, but led by women decide to go to the UN and European conferences to announce they elicit support in their financial tactics to overwhelm the tyranny of Donald Trump’s quid pro quos with the Dakota Access Pipeline Company. Interestingly, their interests align with climate change activists against fossil fuel development. And thus far in their “Divestment Movement,” they have 1000 divestment commitments made by companies to for a total of over $11.4 trillion worldwide to relinquish use and exploitation of fossil fuels in a forward thrust toward massive projects in renewable energy

Protestors came from all over, 'The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Protestors came from all over, ‘The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

Kring interviews key water protectors. She follows their protest movements at Standing Rock Reservation Camp as they peacefully and without weapons pray and protest to stop the exploitation of their land and advertise the dangers of the pipeline to their water supply which relies on the cleanliness of the Missouri River. During the process, the Obama Administration’s Army Corp of Engineers is supposed to complete an impact statement. As the water protectors wait on them, the Dakota Access Pipeline moves in. No agreements were made between the Indigenous tribes in the area. And the PR company for the pipeline accuses the tribes of being out-of-state and not directly impacted by the pipeline. Those lies are smashed as the stand-in continues and Democracy Now takes photographs and videos of the abuse of the Native Americans at the hands of the goons hired by the pipeline to run roughshod and with impunity over the land to lay the pipe.

DPAL brought the police, guns and tear gas, 'The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
DPAL brought the police, guns and tear gas, ‘The End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

The photographs go viral. And the Nakota, Lakota and Dakota are joined by Viet Nam Vets,Vets of recent wars and environmental activists to fight for the sanctity of water from the Missouri to remain clean from oils leaching into it. All told 15,000 people from around the world protested, staging a sit-in for months. And when they couldn’t resist at their camp on the site of the pipeline and were evicted and arrested in the final days, they took their fight to protests in Washington D.C., and spoke before the U.N. and in global conferences.

This water protect was shot by a rubber bullet in her right eye. She lost her vision. ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock (courtesy of the film)

Interview clips from a scientist reveals that the pipeline is dragged underground through the land to get to its destination. This movement creates breaches which are inevitable with the dragging and placement. Sadly, they are subject to weathering cracks and spring leaks which are practically undetectable until there is a massive accident. Pipelines are notorious for these and over the years in residential areas have created oil pools on lawns creating losses in the millions of housing and costing a fortune to clean-up.

Tear gas, rubber bullets, fire extinguishers were used against unarmed water protectors. 'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' (courtesy of the film)
Tear gas, rubber bullets, fire extinguishers were used against unarmed water protectors. ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ (courtesy of the film)

Kring provides the appropriate background was she asks the right questions from the women who know the subject of the pipeline and its impact blindfolded. When Dakota Access Pipeline was denied access to lands near Bismarck, North Dakota because the possibility of the wealthy commuynity’s water might be polluted and destroyed by pipeline leaks, The Pipeline company petitioned to situate the pipe in a better area where there weren’t any people.

Marching in Washington, DC, continuing Standing Rock, 'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
Marching in Washington, DC, continuing Standing Rock, ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

What they refused to research and what the Army Corp of Engineers didn’t look into was the impact on the environment. The pipeline construction and the potential for an oil disaster afterward is typical of any fossil fuel extraction abuse of the land. First, the extraction of the oil from the shale is a disaster of pollution. Secondly, with any oil leaks from the pipeline, the flora and fauna is crippled and destroyed. One of the water protectors discusses that medicinal plants and edible plants that provide forage for wildlife will be polluted and destroyed.

Magically, the buffalo showed up as a sign to hold on. 'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film
Magically, the buffalo showed up as a sign to hold on. ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

She cites other examples when Native American land was invaded and the flora and fauna was decimated. The near extinction of the Buffalo as a plains animal is one of thousands of examples of what happened when settlers came in and exploited everything they found like dumb brutes not bothering to understand what their impact was having. Furthermore she emphasizes that the pipeline itself is potentially in violation of a number of national acts: Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act to name a few. Equally important, the Pipeline Company was desecrating Native American land: Lakota, Nakota, Dakota. Indeed, running through ancestral lands and graveyards, the pipeline was a desecration.

The water protectors had no weapons but prayer and resolve. 'End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
The water protectors had no weapons but prayer and resolve. ‘End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

Kring’s documentary reveals that these women understand their history and how it entwines with the scourge of colonialism. References to the abuses of schooling Native Americans in Christian schools, sterilization programs, sexual abuse by male clerics and forcing adoptions of children out of wedlock were endemic to Indigenous Peoples in America. Thus, every protest and every fight is an attempt to take their power back.

The water protectors had no weapons but prayer and resolve. 'End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
The water protectors had no weapons but prayer and resolve. ‘End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

The women indicate that they’ve learned the power of keeping their language and customs alive for their children to provide them a nest of comfort, solidarity and the understanding to be proud of their ancestry of Sitting Bull, Rain in the Face and Crazy Horse. Importantly, they recognize the deficiency of colonials, who have forgotten who they are and the culture they came from. Thus, wanting and desperate, colonials have no right to strip Native Americans from their culture, language, land and artifacts. These are sacred treasures of Native Americans. Only now do the women understand the pride of their tribe and their cultural place at the beginning of America.

The American Flag Upside Down=Distress. 'End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,' Shannon Kring director, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)
The American Flag Upside Down=Distress. ‘End of The Line: The Women of Standing Rock,’ Shannon Kring director, Athena Film Festival (courtesy of the film)

This is a film you’ll want to see. It is streaming at Athena Film Festival until 31st of March. Click here for tickets. Click below to get a taste of what you might miss if you don’t see it. https://athenafilmfestival.com/

About caroleditosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is an Entertainment Journalist, novelist, poet and playwright. Writing is my life. When I don't write I am desolate. Carole Di Tosti has over 1800 articles, reviews, sonnets and other online writings. Carole Di Tosti writes for Blogcritics.com, Theater Pizzazz and other New York theater websites. Carole Di Tost free-lanced for VERVE and wrote for Technorati for 2 years. Some of the articles are archived. Carole Di Tosti covers premiere film festivals in the NY area:: Tribeca FF, NYFF, DOC NYC, Hamptons IFF, NYJewish FF, Athena FF. She also covers SXSW film. Carole Di Tosti's novel 'Peregrine: The Ceremony of Power,' is being released in November-December. Her two-act plays 'Edgar,' 'The Painter on His Way to Work,' and 'Pandemics' in the process of being submitted for representation and production.

Posted on March 22, 2021, in Athena Film Festival 2021, Film Festival Screenings, Film News, Film Reviews and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Good review Carole! Keep at it.

    Like

  2. Thanks, Ben. Hope all is well with you and Junko.

    Like

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