‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ Celebrates the Seductive Delights of the Iconic Venue in a Sumptuous Feast for the Senses

Jacqueline B. Arnold, Robyn Hurder, Holly James, Jeigh Madjus, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, John Logan, Justin Levine, Alex Timbers

(L-R): Jacqueline B. Arnold, Robyn Hurder, Holly James, Jeigh Madjus in ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ book by John Logan, Music Supervision, Orchestrations, Arrangements & Additional Lyrics by Justin Levine directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

From the moment you enter the Al Hirshfeld Theatre, a paradise of sensuality embraces your soul and immerses you in the suggestion of hedonistic pleasure. Immediately, you are “eyes wide open,” moving along a course where anything is possible, even an after hours engagement with one of the male, female or transgender perfections of beauty scantily but tastefully adorned, who saunter on the catwalks and peer out at you from the stage. Undulating rhythms and sensual music in this Bohemian Paris Left Bank cabaret/theater/dance hall soothe and allure. The luxurious red and gold appointments, the deep cherry and red velvet variegated stage curtains, the banquets, chandeliers, gleaming brass, the golden cherubim all whisper romance, sex, excitement and a whirlwind of indulgence. Whoever you are, you will be encouraged to understand that you can achieve your vision of an exalted life; a life where freedom, truth, beauty and love raises you above a bruising and squalid reality out there on the dark streets.

Danny Burstein, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timbers, Justin Levine, Sonya Tayeh

Danny Burstein in ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

But inside, this is the Moulin Rouge Club at Moulin Rouge! The Musical. Expect the finest in fantasy and escapism. If your intellect and imagination are ripe to receive, you will never be the same again! As you sense this revelation La Chocolat (Jacqueline B. Arnold) Nini (Robyn Hurder) Arabia (Holly James) Baby Doll (Jeigh Madjus) parade their “stuff” and throatily grind to the beats as they torch out “Lady Marmalade,” in an unforgettable opening number joined by the ensemble. This full throttle ignition is brilliantly conceived with grand style and prodigious effort. by the creative team. My God, what a triumph!

Sahr Ngaujah, Aaron Tveit, Ricky Rojas, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timbers

(L to R): Sahr Ngaujah, Aaron Tveit, Ricky Rojas in ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

The production directed by the illimitable Alex Timbers, with a clever book by John Logan (based on the 2001 Twentieth Century Fox Motion Picture written by Baz Luhrmann and Craig Pearce, directed by Baz Luhrmann) with “to-die-for” music supervision, orchestrations and arrangements by Justin Levine is a towering majestical remembrance of what never was but might have been during the Belle Époque in Paris and specifically at the fin de siè·cle. From the on-point luxurious, sexy, ravishing costumes by Catherine Zuber to the energetic, aggressive, dance numbers choreographed by Sonya Tayeh, this musical is a non stop festival. “Bad Romance” is especially gravitating as a thrilling, energetic, “lemme consume your lips,” head to head, face-off with couples gyrating to the hot Lady Gaga song which thematically epitomizes the romance among the principal couples: The Duke of Monroth (Tam Mutu) Satine (Karen Olivo) Christian (Aaron Tveit) and the lesser lights: Santiago (Ricky Rojas) and Nini (Robyn Hurder) all of whom are sensational in voice, and character portrayals.

Karen Olivo, Aaron Tveit, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timbers Baz Luhrmann

Karen Olivo Aaron Tveit in ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin provided their creative services to the production which is an update of their ground-breaking, award-winning film Moulin Rouge (2001). And indeed, the basic arc of development inspired by a meld of characters and plots from Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La Traviata and Giacomo Puccini’s La Boheme remains with added tweaks of humor, phantasm and fun delivered by incredible performances, perhaps the most preeminent charismatic, chameleon of of them all being the gobsmacking Danny Burstein.

'Moulin Rouge! The Musical' The Company, Alex Timbers

The Company, ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

Burstein is mesmerizing; I could not take my eyes off him. Amidst the splendiferous sets (Derek McLane) and shimmering, vibrantly lit (Justin Townsend) festivities, Burstein, as the club’s artistic owner/showman Harold Zidler, is the “God-like” host of confabulation. And he is damn good at it, in fact so adorable that we understand how and why Harold has kept his “chickens” together through thick and the current financially thin stage of the Moulin Rouge Club’s history.  As Burstein’s Harold winningly controls our imaginations and guides the glory and spectacle, we willingly follow him believing he has our best interests at heart because to him there is no sin, no judgment. Within this space and for this night, we are free to be our fantasies.

Tam Mutu, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timbers

Tam Mutu in ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

What this production does exceedingly well is reveal that the Moulin Rouge Club into which Zidler has put his heart, soul and every red hot cent he owes is an artistic production down to the lavish sets and well-heeled orchestra. And he and the ensemble live for this art. Thus, Burstein’s performance is a revelatory genius of Zidler’s dedication and desperation. Motivated by his craft and concern for his artistic family, his character’s steely sweetness is genuine, his charm and love is pure without oily ingratitude or predatory insidiousness. Above all he makes clear in the behind the scenes discussions with Satine that his desire is to supply his patrons’ complete enjoyment so his company will survive and remain off the streets and away from the impoverished hellishness they all came from.

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

Moulin Rouge! The Musical, The Company, directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

Likewise, Satine’s love for Zidler and her company of friends and compatriots, one of whom is the great painter Toulouse-Lautrec (the very fine, grounded Sahr Ngaujah) reveals they understand the club’s liquidity is their life and happiness. Thus, Satine’s characterization is profound. She is the “read deal:” she is their salvation, their mother, their friend, their life-blood, their sacrifice. The sense of love and community among the ensemble is palpable so we believe Burstein’s Harold when he insists that Satine should “go to hospital,” as her friends insist as well. Without her, they are lost.

Karen Olivo’s Satine is a sensual, hot, earth-mother and high-class courtesan, experienced, wise, unmoved. She is not an ethereal beauty, but dominant, solid in will though failing in flesh. She is a perfect symbol to represent what Harold’s artistic creation stands for, a lotus risen from the mud into full flower which will fade quick;y. Olivo’s fullness of voice soars during her duets with Tveit’s Christian who is her equal in range, power and sensitivity. “The Elephant Medley” (the love song riff mash-up they sing in her boudoir as a “come-on” and “let-down”) that has been enhanced with additional numbers is just smashing.

Karen Olivo, Aaron Tveit, 'Moulin Rouge! The Musical,' Alex Timbers

Karen Olivo, Tam Mutu, ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

Her introduction by Zidler as the “jewel” of the Moulin Rouge Club as she descends on a trapeze singing the “Diamond Medley” symbolizes her ethos and the club’s centrality as a necessity in the hearts of a society at that time and perhaps for all time. Escapism is in; it always was and always will be. The more authentic the fantasy, the better. And Satine, like Zidler, are exceptional conveyors. Their importance is an equivalent to their patrons’ happiness. Thus, she is fitting as a timeless symbol of the club; their interwoven stories will always resonate and instruct with wisdom, which like a diamond shines but cuts.

Obviously, Logan’s book adapted from Luhrmann’s and Craig Pearce’s film, reflects depth in its simple story of artists attempting to survive in a carnivorous world as they use their charms and love inducements to glean wealthy backers. And all goes well, until the artists are hoisted on their own petard of humanity, and they fall fatally in love, and others fall fatally in lust with them. As cultural icons, artists cannot be owned or even possessed. (a not so subtle message to philistines everywhere). Satine and Zidler belong to their art, themselves and the world, as Ngaujah’s Toulouse-Lautrec affirms despite The Duke of Monroth’s insistence that Monroth owns the club and all its performers. It is another intriguing theme. When art is put in the hands of philistine owners, it crumbles for they lack the talent, will and spirit to create. Instead, they should uplift the brilliance of creators like Zidler who know how to draw the crowds but lack the finances to do it.

Ricky Rojas, Robyn Hurder, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timbers,

Ricky Rojas, Robyn Hurder, ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

The scenes when Lautrec and the company rehearse and Mutu’s Duke attempts to assist are particularly to the point and humorous. Monroth’s ego gets in the way after he senses he has lost Satine to Christian, yet is willing to keep her despite her lack of affection for him. And his jealousy rises to spoil the production as Christian’s jealousy rises to provoke the Duke. Yet, the show must go on, but how? Satine, once more must “save the day,” but she is not immortal and will die.

Aaron Tveit, Karen Olivo, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Alex Timber, Justin Levine, Sonya Tayehs

Aaron Tveit, Karen Olivo, ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical,’ directed by Alex Timbers (Matthew Murphy)

As rivals for her love and lust Tveit’s Christian and Mutu’s Duke are worthy. The intricacies of plot which involve Satine’s eventual love for the innocent and consumed Christian and sexual enticement of the Duke are woven adroitly. Particularly delightful are Mutu’s mash-up of Mick Jagger’s songs (his “Sympathy for the Devil” could have gone on longer). And the conversion of lyrics to a male orientation for Rihanna’s “Only Girl” are hilarious. Mutu manages to be wicked but sexy and seductive. His intentions are insidious but he retains the exceptionalism of aristocracy that assumes privilege from generational wealth that goes back centuries. Importantly, it is the humor in Mutu’s depiction that keeps him interesting and edgy and not loathsome, which is in keeping with the comedic tone of the production.

As a keen and successful rival, Tveit expertly tweaks the humor related to Christian’s creating his compositions in the funny scene when he first befriends Lautrec and Santiago. He does this with expert timing and together the three render their exchange into pure farce. His “Ohio” demeanor evolves by the conclusion from a “lad”  to a man who “comes into his own.” He is every inch the authentic lover. His duets with Satine in which they both feed song refrains to each other are happily playful, suggestive and grounded. And in the delivery of his last songs, Tveit is amazing, heartfelt, sonorous.  As a couple in a loving affair that grows into something more, Tveit and Olivo strike powerful resonances.

Nothing more can be lauded about Mouline Rouge! The Musical except that the sound design by Peter Hylenski was on point, balanced, targeted. I heard words from well known songs that I never “got” before, for example Katy Perry’s “Firework,” which Olivo sends into the heavens as a PURE WOW! As a result I could greater appreciate the character development, the themes, symbols, the ironies, the true riches of this mythic production because the song mash-ups and medleys were crystal clear.

This is a Broadway show in the true spirit of New York City’s greatness. To see these performers, you should get tickets immediately and if you can order another set to revisit a month or two out. I guarantee that seeing it again, you will note many other elements that you missed the first time around as you peel back layers. If you can’t see it again, some of the music is on Youtube. Check for updates.

The show runs with one intermission at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on West 45th street. For tickets and times CLICK HERE.

The cast album is currently available for streaming at https://smarturl.it/MRtheMusical

 

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About caroleditosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is an Entertainment Journalist, unpublished novelist, poet and playwright. Writing is my life. When I don't write I am desolate. Carole Di Tosti has over 1000 articles, reviews, and other writings online. Carole Di Tosti writes for Theater Pizzazz and other New York theater websites; Carole Di Tost free-lanced for VERVE and wrote for Technorati for 2 years until the site changed its focus and Blogcritics which is archived. Carole Di Tosti covers premiere film festivals in the NY area:: Tribeca FF, NYFF, DOC NY, Hamptons IFF, NYJewish FF. She also covers SXSW film.

Posted on September 13, 2019, in Broadway, NYC Theater Reviews and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Thoroughly enjoyed your review! A thoughtful
    and on point vision that allows one to be drawn into.
    Thank you!
    Camille Block

    Like

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