Category Archives: Around the Region

Chihuly and Pumpkins at New York Botanical Garden’s Fall Weekend

Chihuly Exhibit, 'Sol de Citron,' NYBG 2017, Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Nights (Carole Di Tosti)

Chihuly Exhibit, ‘Sol de Citron,’ NYBG 2017, Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Nights (Carole Di Tosti)

Last weekend at the New York Botanical Garden was my last time to say goodbye to the Chihuly Exhibit. I have visited the exhibit a number of times, but each time is fresh and different. One reason is because Dale Chihuly’s outdoor sculptures refract and reflect the changes in sunlight during the changing seasons, from spring to fall.

Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Exhibit, NYBG, Chihuly Nights, Chihuly Chandeliers

Stunning Chihuly chandeliers at the NYBG Chihuly Exhibit, Dale Chihuly, New York Botanical Garden, Chihuly Nights (Carole Di Tosti)

Chihuly Exhibit, NYBG, Chihuly Days, NYBG Garden Shop

Dale Chihuly’s art glass for sale in the NYBG Garden Shop, Chihuly Exhibit, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

Dale Chihuly’s Macchia Forrest (2017), Jazz & Chihuly, Songs of Protest & Reconciliation, New York Botanical Garden, summer concert series

Dale Chihuly’s ‘Macchia Forrest’ (2017), ‘Jazz & Chihuly, Songs of Protest & Reconciliation’ NYBG summer concert series (Carole Di Tosti)

Dale Chihuly, Macchia Forrest, NYBG 2017, Chihuly Nights

Dale Chihuly’s ‘Macchia Forrest’ (2017), another view, Chihuly Nights, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

 

Another reason is because no matter how closely you look at a piece, you will notice something unique every time. Perhaps it is the way the colors merge into each other on some pieces or the way the glass curves or projects starkly upward. With the sculptures that are housed indoors at the Enid A. Haupt conservatory, for example Macchia Forest, 2017, Chihuly’s vibrant colors startle in multi-colored  tulip-shaped cups arising from iron-like stems in the conservatory’s indoor pond and fountain gorgeously arranged with hanging flowering plantings. One could remain there all day or in the evening with a drink during Chihuly Nights. The rich ambience delights and the sounds of water splaying in the fountain soothe. As with all of Chihuly’s sculptures thoughtfully arranged in or around water, the reflections dazzle and enthrall with their multi-dimensional views.

C, NYBG 2017, Dale Chihulyhihuly Exhibit, 'Sapphire Star,' 2010

Chihuly Exhibit, ‘Sapphire Star,’ 2010, NYBG 2017, Dale Chihuly (Carole Di Tosti)

Sapphire Star 2010, NYBG 2017, Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Nights

‘Dale Chihuly’s ‘Sapphire Star’ 2010, NYBG 2017, Chihuly Nights (Carole Di Tosti)

I will sorely miss this exhibit which stirs the imagination toward infinite and graceful fantasies that one conjures up in brilliant dreams. I have become used to catching the falling sunlight at dusk as it stirs the effervescence and evolving, sparkling, deep blue, shimmering hues on Sapphire Star 2010, NYBG 2017 amidst the darkening shadowy green of the landscape and deepening black shapes of the trees. Sapphire Star 2010, installed at NYBG 2017 is my favorite. I enjoyed seeing it in high noon brilliance or in the surrounding darkness enhanced with a few ground lights along the Garden path that is out of the Chronicles of Narnia. My imagination runs wild. And if I were indeed alone without anyone near me, I would expect a unicorn or centaur to jump out from behind a tree and admiringly gaze at this groundling star whose other-worldy beauty beckons.

Chihuly Exhibit, Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 & 2, Chihuly Nights, NYBG 2017

Chihuly Exhibit, ‘Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 & 2,’ Chihuly Nights, NYBG 2017 (Carole Di Tosti)

Chihuly Exhibit, Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 & 2, Chihuly Nights NYBG 2017

A closer view! Chihuly Exhibit, ‘Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 & 2,’ Chihuly Nights, NYBG 2017 (Carole Di Tosti)

Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Exhibit, Float Boat and Koda Studies # 1 & 2, NYBG 2017

A closer view!! Chihuly Exhibit, ‘Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 & 2,’ Chihuly Nights, NYBG 2017 (Carole Di Tosti)

 

This past weekend I also strayed beyond the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden to visit the Native Plant Garden where Chihuly’s Float Boat and Koda Studies #1 and #2 herald all that might be accomplished when the creative spirit is allowed to run wild amidst a natural platform. Again, Dale Chihuly combines contrasting shapes, sizes and forms. There are the comforting huge glass balls of every shining hue imaginable displayed in a an oblong vessel held up by a flowing water pond.. In the nighttime, the view widens its depth. Which is is solid? Which is fluid? And indeed physics will explain that both are double images of each other for all contain infinitesimal atoms which spin at incredible speeds and play havoc with what appears to be real but which is something else entirely. A true mind-blast and pageantry of excellence.

Chihuly Nights, Dale Chihuly, Native Plant Garden, NYBG

Guitar player accompanying our views in the Native Plant Garden, NYBG, Chihuly Nights (Carole Di Tosti)

That evening a guitar player shared his repertoire as we hailed the Chihuly’s Koda Studies # 1 and 2. Chihuly designed these specifically for the exhibit, honoring his original Artpark installation designed with friend Seaver Leslie in Lewiston, New York in 1975. That significant installation launched Dale Chihuly as a glass artisan and he has been flying into glory ever since.

NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, Chihuly Exhibit, Dale Chihuly, Chihuly Nights

Walking to the Native Plant Garden we encounter spooky pumpkins on the way. NYBG, Chihuly Exhibit, Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

NYBG Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Spooky pumpkins, NYBG Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

As we sauntered along the path viewing Chihuly’s muted dark fuschia, red and yellow glass panes pinging off the lengthy water display in the Native Plant Garden, our senses were regaled. The native grasses, wild herbs, shrubs and dying foliage exuded gorgeous aromas released in the humid night air. There was a sense of freedom and exploration I felt. Tell me where else in New York City can one travel safely along landscaped, tree-lined paths in the nighttime breathing clean air with heavenly scents except at a NYBG evening exhibit.

Everett Children's Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG

Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG (Carole DI Tosti

Everett Children's Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

NYBG Children's Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

Everett Children's Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG

Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

Everett Children's Adventure Garden, NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG,

Pumpkin grown by the Synders, from Bessemer, Pennsylvania weighs 1,261 pounds, NYBG Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

During the daytime I walked amongst the still-green trees which are here and there beginning to prepare for fall and winter. I stepped into the fun-filled Everett Children’s Adventure Garden and watched the kids enjoy themselves everywhere they went. The Children’s Garden was packed. The humongous pumpkins patiently sat as children scrambled on top of them and families posed for pictures. Each of the gigantic specimens were record-breakers. (see below for stats) Families sought and found enormous pumpkins, gourds, and squashes – it was also Giant Pumpkin Weekend, and families came to see these incredible natural wonders.

NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Conquering a record-breaking pumpkin, (2,269 lbs) from England at NYBG Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Conquered! Record-breaking pumpkin, (2,269 lbs) from England at NYBG Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

Kids and parents took pictures standing on them, climbing them, sitting on them, and standing next to them. Giant Pumpkin Weekend, arranged in collaboration with the Great Pumpkin Commonwealth, showed off the growers’ skills at nurturing the hugest (I know that’s not a word), most fantabulous (or that either) pumpkins. Each of these record-breakers from around the world weighed in at more than a ton.

How these pumpkins’ DNA allows them to expand boggles the mind. Importantly, growers come to share how this happens in the growing process during Q&As.

Recapping the record-breakers and their growers for 2017.

This year’s largest pumpkin traveled from Sumner, Washington, bringing with it the North American all-time record. Nurtured by Joel Holland, the “Great Pumpkin” weighed in at 2,363 pounds.

The second-largest pumpkin ever grown came from the United Kingdom, with that country’s all-time record of 2,269 pounds. Ian Paton and Stuart Paton grew this lovely.

Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG

Largest squash grown, 2,118 lbs, NYGB Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

Finally, at the entrance of the Leon Levy Visitors Center you will find the largest squash grown in the world this year. This all-time record-breaker grown by Joe Jutras hails from North Scituate, Rhode Island. It weighs in at 2,118 pounds.

NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Pumpkins everywhere in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG

Pumpkins everywhere in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

Giant Pumpkin Weekend, Everett Children's Adventure Garden, NYBG

Pumpkins everywhere in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend (Carole Di Tosti)

If you missed this annual fun event the weekend of 21-22 October, don’t worry. The display continues through 31 October. And if you can’t make it this year, next year the Garden will be hosting amazing record-breaking specimens again. You know they will be even larger.

Another fun event at the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden involved costumes and goodies. Children dressed in costumes visited the Whole Foods Market® Trick-or-Treat Trail. Since Whole Foods offered the treats, you know they had to be nutritious and delicious. No candy corn could be found anywhere on those Whole Foods Market tables. Additionally, children could decorate a bag to collect their goodies, which included a “children’s sized” baby spider plant anxious to receive a new home.

Creepy Creatures of Halloween, Everett Children's Adventure Garden, NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Reptile wrangler with Sheldon a beautiful turtle, NYBG, Creepy Creatures of Halloween, Everett Children’s Adventure Garden (Carole Di Tosti)

NYBG, Giant Pumpkin Weekend

Petting Skittles the milk snake, Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

Giant Pumpkin Weekend, NYBG

Petting Wilma a very sweet and popular lizard, Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

One event I particularly enjoyed took place at the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions. Kids and parents came curious to see what creepy, spooky creatures of Halloween might crawl around, fly, or calm down to be petted. The live animal presentation revealed interesting reptiles from everywhere, perhaps even some backyards upstate or in the South.

In the photos are the popular Wilma, a lizard who sustained the children petting her with peace and calm, and Skittles the milk snake who also was petted by the children and remained peaceful throughout. One can see the various creatures Saturdays and Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m. until 29 October.

Chihuly Exhibit, NYBG

A Chihuly piece for sale in the NYBG Garden Shop, Chihuly Exhibit, NYBG (Carole Di Tosti)

The New York Botanical Garden contains a fabulous and beautiful world of treasures for everyone. If you can catch the Chihuly Exhibit during the day, you will be thrilled. Unfortunately, tickets to Chihuly Nights have been sold out for the last week. However, if you go during the day over the weekend, make sure to get there early. The parking is limited. And even if it is a bit colder, New Yorkers and out-of-towners want to take a last breathtaking look at the NYBG Chihuly exhibit before it leaves. Thankfully, I took many pictures in remembrance. When winter approaches in earnest in New York City, I will look back at this article and my pictures in fond remembrance.

For events at the NYGB, CLICK HERE.

 

Patrizio Buanne, The Incredible International Singer in a Video Interview at the Friars Club

Patrizio Buanne, Friars Club, Neapolitan crooner, global entertainer

Patrizio Buanne at the Friars Club, NYC. Patrizio is appearing at the Highline Ballroom on October 22, 2016 at 7:00 pm. CLICK HERE FOR TICKETSClick here for Patrizio’s FB page. (photo by Carole Di Tosti)

How does one remain timeless as a musical performer? If you look at the greats, there are two qualities that come to mind. One element is the repertoire they sing; it speaks to everyone’s heart and resonates with passion. The second element that is required is a stellar, singular voice. In both instances Patrizio Buanne, who is an international entertainer with a heart toward eternal song classics that are loved globally, manifests both.

Patrizio’s multicultural heritage hails from Naples and Austria. When he moved back to Rome, he studied languages: he fluently speaks six. Patrizio, who sang and entertained family and friends as a young child, moved to turn professional in his teens after winning vocal competitions and after a music manager selected him to sing for the “Papal visit” (John Paul II) in Wroclaw, Poland. The song he sang which was half in Italian, half in Polish, had been written for the opening mass. With 85.000 people in attendance, Patrizio’s sudden popularity with the Polish public led to his first local record deal. Success followed success in Italy with a production company that produced shows for RAI and Mediaset. But Patrizio’s goals were expansive. The teenager wanted to be an international recording artist. And now he is.

He is globally known as an entertainer who sings stylistically as a crooner, but also sings pop, jazz, rock and popular international songs. He has a huge global fan base which has been exponentially growing since the first release of Patrizio (2009-Warner music), in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and South Africa. The album went platinum and resulted in a tour of Australia, New Zealand and Asia in May 2010.

On Patrizio’s birthday 2011 Patrizio (Concord records), was released in the US, and hit number 5 on the US Jazz Billboard charts. As most musicians, bands and artists must now do on the release of a recording, the album was followed by concert tours in Australia, New Zealand, Asia, South Africa and the USA.

My video interview with Patrizio at the Friars Club in NYC on Wednesday, 19 October.

Also in 2011 for his South African fan base, he released an album of South African hits interpreted by Patrizio’s incredible voice singing in Italian, English and also Afrikaans language. The album featured duets with South Africa’s most popular singers, “Dankie Sued Afrika” (Universal music).

While this album was going platinum, Patrizio prepared a German-focused album in 2012 Wunderbar (Warner music GSA), where he adds Italian songs and original compositions with the German and Italian language. Just so you realize, the extent of his talents, Patrizio gift for languages is prompting him to move into the South American markets in the next year.

Every time Patrizio releases an album he goes on a global tour, as he did with his fourth worldwide release Viva la Dolce Vita (2015 Universal Music), an album in which he is an “Ambassador for Italian song with unique and singular song interpretations. The album includes new material with an international flavor written especially for him. His CD Bravo Patrizio includes the release of his most popular songs for his first 10 years which he is following through with tours (2016, 2017), in the US, Australia, South Africa, Europe, Latin America and Asia confirmed by advanced sales.

In concert and as I found out in person as you will see in the video interview, Patrizio’s  charm, unforgettable persona and anointed voice allow him to revel in interpreting pop songs and Italian and international standards which have brought in millions of album sales globally. Currently wrapping up his US tour he will be in Richfield, Connecticut at the Ridgefield Playhouse (October 21st), NYC at the Highline Ballroom (October 22nd) and New Jersey at NJPAC (October 28t). CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS

 

KIKU Exhibit at the New York Botanical Garden

Kiku, Ogiku, Kiku: Art of the Japanese Garden

An example of Ogiku at the New York Botanical Garden’s Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden until 30 October. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

 

For those of you who have visited Japan in the fall, you are familiar with kiku and will most probably have fond memories of kiku that you saw in amazing displays wherever you may have walked around Tokyo or other cities in the country. Kiku is the Japanese word for “chrysanthemum.” It is the most venerated of all Japanese fall flowering plants, not only for its beauty, but also for its medicinal qualities and ancient cultural tradition.

What is most amazing is how the Japanese for centuries have maintained what is now becoming the dying art of training and shaping liku into the most incredible designs. It is becoming a dying art because the process of training the growing, fragile Kiku into such lovely shapes requires great skill and is tremendously labor intensive. One false move, one mistake and the entire display may be ruined. Kiku are “no joke.” And it is for that reason they are celebrated in Japan as part of the traditional Japanese custom of enjoying the ephemeral beauty of flowers, known as hanami.

kiku, chrysanthemum, NYBG, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden

Kiku, the chrysanthemum, is the foundation for all kiku displays. Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden at NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

 

kiku, NYBG, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden

Butterfly kiku, an innovative design at the NYBG exhibit, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Kiku presentations in conceptualization and philosophy are perhaps one of the most fleeting flower arrangements of all. The displays cannot be preserved beyond a few weeks. They are original. They are easily damaged and during the process of the pruning and training, they are incredibly fragile. Considering that it takes 11 months to grow, train and shape kiku into a cascade design, for example, for 11 months of labor, one receives, if one is careful, two to three weeks of beauty that vanishes as if it never lived at all. It is that impermanence of life that is so captivating a reminder for us to appreciate all that is beautiful for a season, until it withers. The irony is that kiku cannot even regrow their shapes. So, the artistry required to get them to their state of loveliness is truly exceptional

Indeed, one wonders why, in our fast paced digital age, anyone cares about pinching the buds off some flowers to effect beauty. Precisely. When one understands the process and the effort, one appreciates their pageantry. Besides, like all craft and artistry, if it can be preserved, we stay connected with our historical past and the past of other countries and their cultures. In our blink-and-it’s gone current cultural oppression of time, kiku are at once given to us from the ancients and are made modern by having those who care bring the art into the 21st century.

Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden, NYBG

Kengai, cascade kiku at the NYBG exhibit, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The NYBG has taken on the laborious craft in order to insure that the art will continue to be enjoyed by visitors from Japan as well as those who are familiar with the fall chrysanthemums, but are unfamiliar with the ability of the plants to be trained and designed into magnificent trees, cascades, bridges and more. Each year the NYBG has its kiku exhibit in the fall, pioneered by the chrysanthemum masters at the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden in Tokyo who educated Yukie Kurashina. Yukie has trained others like James Harkins in the fine art of floral theater. And under the supervision of Marc Hachadourian, Director of the Nolan Greenhouses for Living Collections, James (foreman of gardeners) and kiku expert Yukie with scores of volunteers have made the kiku exhibit at the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory into  a place of refuge mirroring the past and merging it with the present.

kiku NYBG, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden

Ozukuri, thousand bloom display at the NYBG exhibit, Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

During the exhibit Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden, you will see three traditional kiku styles:

  • Ozukuri which means thousand bloom. A single stem of a chrysanthemum plant is trained to produce hundreds of simultaneous blossoms in a massive umbrella-shaped display.
  • Kengai which means cascade. Small-flowered chrysanthemums are pruned and pinched to frameworks that flow downward like waterfalls for lengths up to six and one-half feet.
  • Ogiku which means double and triple stem. These are enormous individual flowers presented at the end of stems that can reach up to six feet tall.

Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden is running from October 8 through October 30. For the full programming schedule that follows this exhibit, click HERE for the NYBG website.

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Cynthia von Buhler and Speakeasy Dollhouse Productions: Interview Wrap Up

Cynthia von Buhler, Speakeasy Dollhouse, The Bloody Beginning, Wyelin, Brooklyn

The lovely Cynthia von Buhler. Photo courtesy of Speakeasy Dollhouse productions and Cynthia von Buhler.

I had the opportunity to briefly chat with Cynthia von Buhler in between her busy schedule producing her widely popular show in a new venue in Brooklyn. Amidst my attending indie movie screenings, Off Broadway and Broadway shows, wine tastings and doing interviews and write-ups, we finally agreed to an online interview.

Here’s a bit of information about the prodigiously talented Ms. von Buhler. Cynthia is the producer, director, playwright of Speakeasy Dollhouse Productions: The Bloody Beginning, The Brothers Booth, The Midnight Frolic and The Illuminati Ball. Each of these productions is a wild, immersive phantasmagoria where the audience not only gets to watch and enjoy but also becomes part of the action. The action is replete with the macabre, the beautiful, the damned in an intense, showy spectacular that turns traditional theater on its head and sparks your craving to see the productions again and again. Each night is different and spins out of control into an extraordinary evening of entertainment including drinks and food, if you so dare to purchase.

Extraordinary is the only way to describe the one-of-a-kind, multiple sense titillation you partake of going to a Cynthia von Buhler presentation. She is a great gal, adorable, ebullient, innovative. I have seen and reviewed two of her shows for Blogcritics. The reviews are at these links. Midnight Frolic Review.  The Brothers Booth. Here is my email wrap-up with Cynthia.

The Bloogy Beginning, Cynthia von Buhler, Speakeasy Dollhouse Productions,

‘The Bloody Beginning,’ a Speakeasy Dollhouse presentation conceived, directed, produced by Cynthia von Buhler. Photo courtesy of Cynthia von Buhler.

How did you evolve Speakeasy Dollhouse?

In 2011 I decided to do a Kickstarter to research the mysterious murder of my grandfather in 1935. The Kickstarter was for a book and a one night immersive play. The play was such a hit that it never stopped after all these years and it spawned three other plays.

Link to Cynthia’s KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN

Link to a Teaser Trailer VIMEO of Cynthia’s production, Speakeasy Dollhouse, THE BLOODY BEGINNING

Getting Acquainted Link to Cynthia von Buhler’s The Speakeasy Dollhouse

Speakeasy Dollhouse, 'The Bloody Beginning,' Cynthia von Buhler, Wyelin, Brooklyn

From ‘The Bloody Beginning’ The Speakeasy Dollhouse. Photo courtesy of Cynthia von Buhler who conceived, directed and produced the show.

How does your style of theater differ from the mainstream. Why should people flock to your show in Brooklyn?

Immersive theater is interactive and exploratory. It engages the audience and transports them to another time and place. Rather than watch a play, the audience is in the play.
Ed. Note: (I would venture to say that the audience becomes the play. It’s a surreal Rene Magritte experience.)

Explain what your current show is about and how you have updated/perfected/workshopped it to precision.

Cynthia von Buhler, The Speakeasy Dollhouse: The Bloody Beginning

Photo from ‘The Speakeasy Dollhouse: The Bloody Beginning,’ conceived, directed, produced by Cynthia von Buhler.

This show is a return to my first immersive play, Speakeasy Dollhouse: The Bloody Beginning. It’s about the murder of my grandfather. The challenge this time was moving it to a new location. Weylin (the former Williamsberg Savings Bank), is absolutely gorgeous and sprawling, so the experience might even be better than when we did it at The Back Room.

How many years have you been producing the show?

Each show is a workshop of sorts, so it has been workshopped for five years.

Ed. Note: (She has produced it for 5 years since her Kickstarter campaign and that is how long she has been producing her shows.)

The Speakeasy Dollhouse: The Bloody Beginning, Cynthia von Buhler

Photo courtesy of Cynthia von Buhler from ”The Speakeasy Dollhouse: The Bloody Beginning’ at Weylin in Brooklyn.

In what way does the show turn male chauvinism on its head? Or does it?

That is an interesting question. Italians at that time period were often chauvinists. This is a period piece and the goal of the work isn’t about fighting that. My grandmother was a powerful woman though. She had a shotgun and she used to protect the ice truck filled with bootleg from the mafia when they went up to Canada to buy whiskey.

What is your training and background in the theatre, the arts, acting?

My training is in visual art. I have a Bachelor of Fine Art from The Art Institute of Boston and I studied art At Richmond College in England. I grew up in the Berkshires of Massachusetts surrounded by theater. I have been involved in creating theater since I was a child when I acted in your typical productions of Oklahoma, Peter Pan, West Side Story and the like. I can still do a rousing rendition of Oklahoma.

The Illuminati Ball, Cynthia von Buhler

‘The Illuminati Ball,’ conceived, directed, produced by Cynthia von Buhler. Photo courtesy of the production.

What have been some memorable performances given the wild, interactive style you embrace?

I’m enjoying my new show, The Illuminati Ball. It’s my most surreal and bizarre show yet. It’s an immersive excursion which means we transport our audience by limousine to a location for a transportive experience

Link to visuals of Cynthia’s The Illuminati Ball.

The Bloody Beginning at Weylin may be extended. Performance dates:

When: 7/22, 7/23, 8/12, 8/13

What: Speakeasy Dollhouse

Price: $60 (regular admission); $120 (Ten VIP admission – no waiting in line, table seating, champagne toast); $200. (2 VIM admission {Very Important Murder} – same as VIP with a murder role.

Purchase tickets at: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2554772

Check back to see if the show is extended or the production is being presented at another venue.

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Screenwriters Lab Open Submissions

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The Maidstone, Headquarters of the HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D.

The Hamptons International Film Festival Screenwriters Lab is open for submissions.

ABOUT THE LAB

The Hamptons International Film Festival’s Screenwriters Lab is going into its 16th year. The HIFF Lab is an intimate gathering that takes place each Spring in East Hampton, New York  from April 8- 10, 2016.

The Lab develops emerging screenwriting talent. It pairs established writers and creative producers with up-and-coming screenwriters. The screenwriters are selected by HIFF in collaboration with key industry contacts. In a one-on-one creative laboratory setting mentors advise the initiates. Additional events bring the participants together with board members, sponsors, the local artistic community, and other friends of the festival. Scripts from past year’s screenwriters have gone on to production year after year. The vital feature of The Lab is that it has and will continue to be an inspirational, safe venue where artists can perfect their craft and creative vision.

                                    

Recent Lab projects have evolved into productions that have screened at festivals world wide. These include Sundance, South by Southwest, Katlovy Vary, Locarno and the Los Angeles Film Festival.  Selected highlights include Short Term 12 with Brie Larson (she is currently in the amazing ROOM) and John Gallagher, which won the Grand Jury and Audience Award at SXSW. The Discoverers starring Griffin Dunne, Little Accidents featuring Elizabeth Banks and Chloe Sevigny, Fort Bliss starring Michelle Monaghan and Ron Livingston and Twelve, starring Ellen Barkin and Emma Robers, the 2010 Sundance Film Festival Closing Night film are just a few of the projects that have taken off to success.

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Dennis Quaid, Q & A for HIFF Opening Night screening of TRUTH, film by Screenwriters Lab Mentor James Vanderbuilt. Photo Carole Di Tosti

NOTED LAB MENTORS

Recent HIFF Screenwriters Lab mentors are Alex Dinelaris (Birdman),  Nicole Perlman (Guardians of the Galaxy), Oren Moverman (The Messenger),  Michael Cunningham (The Hours, Evening); James Vanderbilt (Zodiac, Truth), Mark Heyman (Black Swan),  Rob Siegel (The Wrestler),  Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Half Nelson, Sugar, Mississippi Grind), Hawk Ostby (Children of Men),  Whit Stillman (Metropolitan, The Last Days of Disco),  Ira Sachs (40 Shades of Blue, This Married Life),  Andy Bienen (Boys Don’t Cry),  Lawrence Konner (The Sopranos, Boardwalk Empire),  Maria Maggenti (The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love),  and Laurie Collyer (Sherrybaby)

                                      

DEADLINES

Earlybird Deadline | December 1, 2015

Regular Deadline | December 15, 2015

Late Deadline | December 29, 2015

WAB Extended Deadline | January 12, 2016

For more information contact: hamptonsfilmfest.org

PRESS CONTACTS

FRANK PR | 646.861.0843

Lina Plath | lina@frankpublicity.com

Nicole Kerr | nicolek@frankpublicity.com

Interview With Marc Hachadourian, Orchid Curator at the NYBG Orchid Show

March Hachadourian,  Director of the Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections. Marc has more than 15 years of commercial and specialized horticultural experience at the Gardens and much more over the course of his life. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

March Hachadourian, Director of the Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections. Marc has more than 15 years of commercial and specialized horticultural experience at the Gardens and much more over the course of his life. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The 13th Annual Orchid Show: Chandeliers is currently running until April 19th at the New York Botanical Garden. The show is amazingly beautiful and a much-needed encouragement during what sometimes seems like an eternity of winter. During my wondrous visit relaxing amongst the gorgeous blooms, I spoke to Marc Hachadourian, Director of the Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections.

Marc is a fount of information about the orchids. His title belies his down-to-earth nature and sunny personality. I can understand his joy working around such vibrant, luxurious plant life. A fellow photographer kept on remarking during our visit that the Garden is a great place to decompress and rewind from frenetic city life. It’s another world at the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, and Marc’s job is to make sure that all the orchids in the Garden’s permanent collection are as happy with their living conditions as possible. He is also responsible for curating the hybrids brought in and grown for the Orchid Show.

Marc Hachadourian, you’re the resident orchid expert here supervising the care of the botanical collections including the extensive orchid collection and exhibition plants in the Nolen Greenhouses.

Yes. I’m the curator of orchids at the NYBG.

The entrance displays at the NYBG Orchid Show: Chandeliers.

The entrance displays at the NYBG Orchid Show: Chandeliers. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

I know you love orchids from what you told me when I spoke with you last year. Orchids festoon your home where you have a great variety and number of orchids. And you are probably way more successful at keeping and caring for orchids than I am.

In addition to caring for the Garden’s orchid collection, I do have my own personal orchid collection, so some of my friends joke that I need a recovery program for orchid addiction because I leave one orchid collection to take care of another. It is something that I absolutely love. I was joking with a friend that they are my greatest stress and stress relief at the same time. But it is something that I absolutely love. I have been growing orchids now for 30 years and they’ve become a part of my life, like my children. Some people become very attached to their pets. I’ve become very attached to my orchid plants. They don’t have names, though. [laughs] [I laugh]

OK. How old is your oldest orchid?                                       

One variety of the orchids that you will see during the 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

One variety of the orchids that you will see during the 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

At the Garden or my personal collection?

Your personal collection.

Over 20 years old.

I know at the Garden that those beautiful orchids encased in glass – those rare orchids –

The miniatures.

The miniatures are old.

Some of them aren’t. They range in age in our collection. But some of our oldest orchids in our permanent collection…are not on display because they are not flowering at this time of year, but we actually have plants in our botanical collections here at the Garden that are over 100 years old. People assume that a 100-year-old orchid must be the size of a house, but in reality, some of the plants may be miniature, so you may be able to hold a 100 years of orchid growth in your hands.

The 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The walkways are a colorful pageant of orchids high in the air and on the ground. Around 200,000 or more people come to The Orchid Show each year. NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The walkways are a colorful pageant of orchids high in the air and on the ground. Around 200,000 or more people come to The Orchid Show each year. NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

So it’s something that we have a long historic orchid collection here at the NYBG. In fact we have one of the best orchid collections of any institution. There are about 7,000 specimens in our permanent orchid collection. We have all different sizes and different types. You had mentioned the miniature orchid which we have on display in the conservatory where we pull out a lot of the really interesting and unusual botanical plants from our collection, plants that you might walk by if they were put next to some of these really flashy hybrids.

Orchids are the largest flowering plant family and they vary size from the head of a pin to 25 feet tall. Photo by Carole Di Tosti, The Orchid Show at NYBG.

Orchids are the largest flowering plant family and they vary size from the head of a pin to 25 feet tall. Photo by Carole Di Tosti, The Orchid Show at NYBG.

Theordore Roethke described orchids blooms as adder tonged. The 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Theodore Roethke described orchids blooms as adder mouthed. The 13th Annual Orchid Show at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

But in reality there are some orchids in the glass case right now that in the palm of your hand in that miniature plant you can hold anywhere from 700 to 1,000 individual blooms on a single plant. Of course, the flowers are so tiny, they are no bigger than the head of a pin, but it is wonderful to hold a plant with that many beautiful flowers. They are from a range of geographic habitats, everywhere from Australia, Southeast Asia, South America, and a range of sizes [1/16 of an inch in diameter to giants more than 25 feet tall], colors, shapes. It’s one of the things that surprises people when they come to the Orchid Show. It’s not just the beauty of our displays, but the extreme diversity within one plant family, the orchid family.

These very rare miniatures – were they sent?

NYBG, orchids, The Orchid Show, Marc Hachadourian, Orchid Curator at NYBG

An adder-mouthed Phalaenopsis. NYBG The Orchid Show: Chandeliers. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

No these are part of our permanent collection that we grow in the back of the greenhouses and that we bring out when they flower.

Do you grow them by seed?

We grow them by division mostly. Sometimes, they will be sourced by specialist orchid nurseries and because we have not only a display collection but a noted research collection, one of my important jobs as the curator of the orchid collection is making sure that we have the proper diversity and a proper survey of the orchid family represented in our botanical collections, so researchers all over the world can come here and use our collections.

It is much like a living library of plants. So if you want to think of it as a library collection or an art collection, that fits. If you specialize in Impressionism, you want to make sure you have a few Monets and a few of this and a few of that. It’s the same thing with developing an institutional orchid collection.

It is much like a living library of plants. So if you want to think of it as a library collection or an art collection, that fits. If you specialize in Impressionism, you want to make sure you have a few Monets and a few of this and a few of that. It’s the same thing with developing an institutional orchid collection.

There are thousands of orchids displayed in airy chandelier baskets at the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

There are thousands of orchids displayed in airy chandelier baskets at the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

orchids, NYBG, Orchid Show, orchid chandeliers, Marc Hahadourian

Orchids love filtered light and plenty of air around their roots. They grow from seed or division; seed is harder. NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

You want to make sure you have representative display, not only orchids from each country, but from each type of orchid that grows around the world. So we have one of the largest and one of the most widely represented orchid collections of any institution in the world.

There are also orchids for sale at the NYBG garden shop. When the weather is nicer, I will buy a pansy orchid. The Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

There are also orchids for sale at the NYBG garden shop. When the weather is nicer, I will buy a pansy orchid. The Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

This is the centerpiece orchid chandelier catching the hues of light and smiling down on all who pass under the basket. 13th Annual Orchid Show, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

This is the centerpiece orchid chandelier catching the hues of light and smiling down on all who pass under the basket. 13th Annual Orchid Show, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The orchid family is the largest flowering plant family. There are over 30,000 naturally occurring species and now over 150,000 man-made hybrids. They’re found on every continent of the world except Antarctica and everywhere from deserts to swamps to tropical rain forests, even up to the Arctic tundra. So even places that you don’t usually associate with orchids normally have orchids. When you think of this family, you think of the tropics, the rainforest, but there are orchids native to Alaska. And there are even orchids growing within Manhattan itself. There are native species.

orchids, NYBG, The Orchid Show, Marc Hachadourian

Orchids come in an incredible range of colors that would make crayola jealous. NYBG The Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

orchids, NYBG, Orchid Show, Marc Hachadourian, orchid curator at NYBG

When I was a kid, I found a Lady’s Slipper on LI. It was beautiful and wild. I left the plant alone. NYBG, The Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Lady Slipper?

I don’t know if there are any Lady Slippers still growing in Manhattan, but there are Lady Slipper species growing throughout New York State.

Many of these native species, which are protected by law, can still be found, although rarely in the Tri-State area [New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut]. So these are a few details that you wouldn’t normally think about orchids.

NYBG Orchid Show, orchids, NYBG, orchid curator, Marc Hachadourian, orchid gardening

I can never tire of looking at these pictures of orchids the harbinger of spring. NYBG The Orchid Show: Chandeliers. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Are there species that you think are still undiscovered or that you are trying to get a hold of that are very rare?

Absolutely. There are many rare orchid species. It is just a matter of patience before we are able to acquire some of those plants and add them

to our collection. Just like there are very few Vermeers in our world and everybody would like to have one as a part of their art collection, these rare plants are a bit more challenging to come by. But in our orchid collection, there are orchid species that are discovered every year. Dozens of species are newly described. People might go into an area they’ve never been before and find something new. Sometimes they are right under your nose. There are areas that are well traveled that have orchids. But you would have to have been there at exactly the right moment to see the orchid flower.

orchids, NYBG, Marc Hachadourian, The Orchid Show

These are popular pansy orchids. They have a sweet face and they are the colorful chandeliers of light thronging the path over your head. The Orchid Show, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

So it’s fascinating that every year there are so many new species described and discovered.

Some of these orchids, the rare ones, must be extremely valuable.

The value on some of these orchids to the obsessive collector wanting the rarest of the rare, the most unusual plant can create an exaggerated pricing.

Like the tulips? [we both laugh].

Yeah, almost like the tulip mania of the 15-16th centuries. But the value we place on our plants is not something financial. It’s conservation value, biological diversity value. For some of these plants it may be that they have a wonderful history or the orchid may be a rare hybrid. So for that, their value would be almost priceless for what they represent in the orchid family.

NYBG, The Orchid Show, orchids, Marc Hachadourian

Another type of orchid variety that prefers to be on the ground. NYBG The Orchid Show: Chandeliers. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The loss of one? I know how I feel if I lose an orchid or one of my plants; I’m devastated.

Well, I’m sad. If it’s something beyond your control then you do get sad at those moments. But there are more successes than failures, so that makes up for it.

You must have read Susan Orlean’s book, The Orchid Thief?

I have to admit I never read the book. The reason why is that it is a somewhat fictionalized account about people that I know. So it’s kind of odd to read since it’s based on a series of actual events and I know some of the people involved. It almost kind of feels awkward to me. So it would be like if someone made a fictional tale about your life, you’d be reading it. But it’s a wonderful book and I’ve read parts of it. I never have read it in its entirety. Probably, the real key is having that free time to be able to read it. [we laugh]

NYBG, orchids, The Orchid Show, Marc Hachadourian

Ground orchids that complement the light filled colorful orchid chandeliers. NYBG, The Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Thanks so much for speaking to me. You are so knowledgeable, I enjoyed talking with you.

Enjoy the show.

Oh, one more question. You were going to check on how many orchids comprise the Orchid Show.

Mark confers with a colleague who says, “We always say thousands.”

One might die at any moment.

We are replacing plants throughout the show so the exact number is always changing. We know that at any one time there are thousands. Having anyone actually count them…?

No – it would be a dizzying effort.

The 13th Annual NYBG Orchid Show: Chandeliers is being exhibited now until April 19th, 2015. Click here for tickets.

The 13th Annual Orchid Show-a Magnificent Herald of Spring at the NYBG

A centerpiece of orchids at the introduction of the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

A centerpiece of orchids at the introduction of the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

March 5th, a plane at LaGuardia skidded off the icy, snowy runway. A wet, unwelcome, sterile, white dirge blanketed the area. Who knows how many more intermittent days of abysmal cold, sleet, snow, and ice will oppress? Though there seems no end to this weariness, there is a herald of spring at the New York Botanical Gardens.

It is the 13th Annual Orchid Show. A renaissance of beauty and hope hangs high in the orchid baskets’ blazing, airy, living, colorful auras. These amazing and most popular of flowering plants shine their blossoms and illuminate their colors upward toward the palatial ceiling of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.

How welcome to me are these stunning, brilliantly conceived and executed flowery clusters. They are truly a spiritual and emotional uplift to take me to the end of the long, blistering winter to sing in the sweetness of springtime.

13th Annual NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

13th Annual NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Dazzling chandeliers of orchid color at the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Dazzling chandeliers of orchid color at the NYBG Orchid Show. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The theme of the show this year couldn’t be more appropriate or illuminating; it is “Chandeliers.” Everywhere you saunter through the delicate looking Victorian-style glasshouse, you see the mysterious, sensual, ripe, and fecund vividness of arcing orchids curving out like delicate feathers. There are thousands of them.

Pendant, striking orchids at the Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Pendant, striking orchids at the Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Different varieties of orchids create a lacy effect. The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Different varieties of orchids create a lacy effect. The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Pools of water reflect their petals in a kaleidoscope of pastels, tints, shades, and darkest hues. Not only are the Cymbidium and Cycnoches landscaped exquisitely amongst the flora of the greens, reds, yellows of the ferns, palms, dracenas, and other botanical varieties that flourish in abundance in the warmth and moisture of the conservatory. But the adder-tongued (Theodore Roethke’s description), blooming plants are the stellar creations, the showpieces above the pathways in pendant, lustrous, rainbow baskets.

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13th Annual Orchid Show: Chandeliers at the NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Pansy orchids beckon on the pathway into the conservatory depths at The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Pansy orchids beckon on the pathway into the conservatory depths at The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Their powerful, subtle beauty is the  growing candelabra that lights the way. The orchid chandeliers are a vibrant multi-layered overflow of pinks, violets, whites, tawny oranges, yellows, purples, reds. It is enough to mesmerize and gladden the most sorrowful and dour of hearts. Look up, twirl around, everywhere are Cattleyas and Phalaenopsis of a multitude of varieties and a range of colors that poor crayola only wishes they could duplicate.

For the first time, the concept “Chandeliers” throngs the crystal palace Conservatory, slipping beyond the Seasonal Exhibition Galleries into the Tropical Rain Forest Galleries and others.The exhibit is conceptualized and designed by the Botanical Garden’s Francisca Coelho, the Vivian and Edward Merrin Vice President for Glasshouses and Exhibitions, who is noted as “the best female head gardener working under glass today.”

The next time I visit the show, I will try to purchase a pansy orchid at the Garden Shop. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The next time I visit the show, I will try to purchase a pansy orchid at the Garden Shop. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

But as in other past orchid shows, the amazing history and conservation stories of rare and endangered orchids in the rain forests of the world are included and can be read on the cards throughout the exhibit or listened to on one’s mobile phone.

Throughout the Garden’s 250 acres in its various venues, The Orchid Show: Chandeliers allows guests the opportunity to learn about the largest family of flowering plants through tours, orchid care demonstrations, and discussions about how the elegant flower chandeliers were made.

There are over 150,000 man-made orchid hybrids. The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

There are over 150,000 man-made orchid hybrids. The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, NYBG. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The arrangement at The 13th Annual Orchid Show at NYBG are breathtaking. PHoto by Carole Di Tosti

The arrangement at The 13th Annual Orchid Show at NYBG are breathtaking. PHoto by Carole Di Tosti

The snow is still falling into the evening. I didn’t buy any orchids when I visited the beloved NYBG shop because I was afraid they would get a chill and “catch their deaths.” It was below freezing and the wind crinkled my face walking to the Enid A Haupt Conservatory. However, the moment the light brightens, the sun is higher overhead and it’s closer to spring, I will return to buy a piquant, fuschia pansy orchid if there are any left. Or I might go for a glass of wine during one of the Orchid Evenings and stop at the shop on my way out. I’ll check to see if there’s an unusual Cattleya for sale. After all, the show runs until April 19, 2015. By then Spring will have adorned us with her presence and my newly bought orchids will remain out of reach of cold cruelty as winter marches toward Peru.

The 13th Annual Orchid Show (Chandeliers) is at The New York Botanical Gardens until April 19, 2015. Click here for tickets.

This feature article first appeared on Blogcritics. Click here.

Julianne Moore 2015 Golden Globe Winner for ‘Still Alice’ Talks up Role Challenges

Julianne Moore, Red Carpet for 'Still Alice,' at the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore, Red Carpet for ‘Still Alice,’ at the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The “Closing Night Film” of the 22nd Hamptons International Film Festival was the U.S. premiere of Wash Westmoreland’s and Richard Glatzer’s film Still Alice, starring Julianne Moore, who last night won the Golden Globe Award for her stunning lead performance.  Including Moore’s best actress Golden Globe, Still Alice has, so far, won 16 awards. (My Blogcritics review of  Still Alice can be found by clicking this link.)

After the screening, Julianne Moore, director/writer Wash Westmoreland and producer Christine Vachon spoke with David Nugent the Artistic Director of the 22nd Hamptons Internation Film Festival. This segment of the lengthy Q. and A. highlights the evolution and challenges Julianne Moore and Wash Westmoreland faced making this amazing film about a linguistics professor who has Early-Onset Alzheimer’s. The film centers on Alice Howland and her family as she realizes what is happening to her and she reaches out for love and support from her family. Together they try to find solutions, staying close to one another as Alice gradually confronts the daily loss of beautiful memories, brilliant acumen, exceptional verbal skills and her very identity.

David Nugent (Artistic Director, 22nd Hamptons International Film Festival): How different an experience was making this film?

Julianne Moore: At the end of the day, the job is the same. You have to create people. You have a story to tell. You have constraints, you have problems and you just solve them. And that’s how I approached it honestly. I just felt like, you have to make this movie and Wash Westmoreland and Richard Glatzer are a team. And one of them can talk and one cannot. And that’s how we did it.

Alec Baldwain and Julianne Moore in 'Still Alice.' Photo from the film.

Alec Baldwain and Julianne Moore in ‘Still Alice.’ Photo from the film.

Christine (Vachon), you produced one of my all time favorite films, Safe which also stars Julianne Moore in which she is suffering from an unnamed disease. How was it working with on this compared to that? In a certain way it has a similar subject matter. That was 20 years ago. Is that right?

Christine Vachon: It’s such a privilege that we have worked together and we are still working together and made Still Alice. And one of the things that I am honored by is that Safe is brought up as kind of a reference point. We are all entangled together. Todd Haynes (he directed Safe), is a close friend of all of ours so his work informs what we do and our work informs what he does. And it’s awesome to be able to be here. The thing about Safe, here’s a plug about the filmit’s about to come out as a Criterion Collection in December with lots of fantastic extras including an interview with Julianne and an interview with me and new stuff and old stuff. And one of the things that is extraordinary about that film is that when it did come out, people didn’t really see what it was. And it is one of those movies that has really stood the test of time in its own way…which goes to show that you don’t always know when a movie comes out if it will resonate.

Julianne Moore smiles at the audience applause: Q & A for 'Still Alice,' the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore smiles at the audience applause: Q & A for ‘Still Alice,’ the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne, I’m curious. Had you read the book of Still Alice first or did you read the script first? How did that come together?

Julianne Moore: No I hadn’t read the book. I read the script first. Richard and Wash and I were talking about another project. We had a really wonderful meeting and we talked back and forth for a while and I said, “Nah, I don’t think that is for me.” And they said, “Well, we have something else.” And they sent me the script right away and I read it and I was like, Wow!” I literally said, “I’ll do this”…immediately. I was in Montauk. I said, “This, I’m going to do.” And then I went and bought the book and when I went to Barnes and Noble it was on the favorites table. And I thought, well, OK. This is like a wildly popular book. I was struck by the narrative right away and the strength of the story and the emotional impact. And I was really blown away by it and terribly frightened because it seemed like a huge undertaking and one that we couldn’t accomplish in like 90 minutes, like a short movie. But I felt privileged to have the offer, frankly.

So what is terrifying in a case like that. Is it capturing the character is it telling the story in 90 minutes?

Julianne Moore: Well, clearly, this is something that’s true; it’s a true story. This is a disease affecting so, so many people, so many individuals, so many families. So there’s a degree of it where you want to get it right as an actress and then there is a narrative issue where you want to be able to tell the story in 90 minutes and bring people into an entertainment. So there are a million obstacles. But at the base of it what was most interesting to me is about what Wash discussed with me in the beginning. He said that it’s about how you face this terrible disease and what is your essential self? You know, it’s asking who are we? Who are we behind our jobs and our clothes and our friendships and our relationships? Who are we at the very core of it? How do you get that right? I didn’t know how to do that. Lisa Genova in her novel kind of depicts it beautifully and she goes in, in, in with this character, but as an actor, I didn’t know if I was going to be able to do it, frankly.

Julianne Moore answering a question about 'Still Alice.' Q & A at the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore answering a question about ‘Still Alice.’ Q & A at the 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

You did it. (the audience applauds in approval and confirmation)  Speaking of Lisa Genova who wrote the book, do you know if she has seen the film?

Wash Westmoreland: Lisa saw the film for the first time at the Toronto Film Festival and she was extremely happy which made us all extremely happy. And she was a complete supportive partner in the whole process. When you’re taking someone’s book and adapting it, there’s all kinds of things…it’s like going into a creative mine field because they have a certain idea of how things are meant to be. The film just has to be allowed to be something different…and at the same time it has to be faithful to the spirit of the book. When we sent off the first draft to Lisa, we were nervous. We didn’t know her. We didn’t know how she’d respond and she wrote back this rapturous email, “I’m so grateful to you for taking my vision further.” She has just been this incredible cheer leader. But we felt a responsibility to people who knew the book to embody the spirit of what’s written on the page. And I also feel like we had to make a film that allows Still Alice to become a cinematic experience. So I hope people who know the book get into the film because we wanted the correlation between the two to be very close.

Julianne was there any particular process for preparing for this role that you undertook?

Julianne Moore in 'Still Alice.' Photo courtesy of the film.

Julianne Moore in ‘Still Alice.’ Photo courtesy of the film.

Well, whenever you do something that’s based on the truth, you know when there’s research to be done…golly, I had so much help. I started with the Alzheimer’s Association. They sent me to Mount Sinai where I talked to researchers and they set me up with several women around the country who had been diagnosed with Early Onset and I went from there to the New York Alzheimer’s Association and support groups. I talked with people who had been recently diagnosed and talked to the people who worked with the families there and ended up in a long term care facility, so there’s always somewhere to go. And each person referred me to the next. And their generosity was extraordinary. I was in a long term care facility and I talked to a woman about her mom because I had been sitting near a window and the people were singing and doing workshop stuff and this woman told me that I should get away from the draft. She was a patient. She said, “Get out of the draft…it’s cold.” And the woman’s daughter was there; she was my age, and she said, “Oh, yeah. My mom worries about people catching cold.” And she talked about her experience with her mother. Everyone was very, very anxious to tell me their story, tell me what their personal experience was, as someone who was dealing with the disease, someone who had a parent, or friend, or whatever. The access I had was really unparalleled. The research I got was really extraordinary.

Julianne Moore, Q & A for 'Still Alice' 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore, Q & A for ‘Still Alice’ 22nd HIFF. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Questions from the audience, for Julianne: Have you had any personal experience with Alzheimer’s?

I haven’t, actually, with the exception of the people I met. It’s interesting.  There is a woman I became very close to who lives in Minneapolis and was one of the very first people I talked to. She was diagnosed at 45 and I saw her on a Skype call. And she looks like me. She has red hair and she’s fair skinned and slender. I was like, “Sandy you could be a sister.” And she ended up consulting with me the entire film and had her 50 birthday on the set. She was on the set the day we did the Alzheimer’s Association speech. So in that sense I felt like I had a connection to someone with Alzheimers, but no, actually I didn’t.

(David Nugent interrupts) Tell them about the article in the New York Times that we were discussing.

There’s an article in the New York Times today that scientists have found a way to create an Alzheimer’s brain in gel. So they can kind of do a facsimile of what an actual brain with Alzheimer’s looks like and they can now test drugs within this so it’s a real breakthrough for treating Alzheimers, so that was exciting. (applause)

Julianne Moore and director Wash Westmoreland at 22nd HIFF US Premiere of 'Still Alice.' Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore and director Wash Westmoreland at 22nd HIFF US Premiere of ‘Still Alice.’ Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Audience Question: How did you find it when you didn’t speak toward the end of the film. What was the hardest part about not being there. I was impressed when you were quiet…changed from the way you were before

What is interesting for me as an actor, on the one hand it was, “Yeah I have no lines.”  But what I observed was that the days I was the most exhausted were the days that I was in the decline of Alice’s life. But what I noticed when I went to observe people in the long term care facilities is the amount of energy it takes for someone to pay attention and to be present and to connect when they are suffering from this really difficult disease. It is extraordinary. I would see this in films with Alzheimer’s patients: how hard it is for them to concentrate, how hard it is for them to be present. I would even see it with people opening their eyes really wide. So the idea that someone is not present or zones out or goes away or goes somewhere else, I found not to be true at all. In fact what I saw was people working very, very hard to concentrate and to hold on to what they understood and to try to be as connected and as alive as possible. So those were the days that were the most exhausting and I was kind of surprised by it. There was a woman I met in a long term care facility who is 65. She was non verbal. I sat down next to her and talked to her about what was going on. She leaned toward me and she copied my expressions and if I gestured somewhere, she’d look over there and she was taking all her emotional and intellectual clues from what I was doing and she was trying very, very hard to stay connected to me. And I was really touched by it because you realize it’s not about people going away. It’s about people trying to stay present.

Audience question: How do you come down to such an emotional role like that? Is it a process. I can’t imagine being in your shoes playing a person with Alzheimers and then going home and moving on.

My children help. I have a 12-year-old and a 16-year-old. They don’t care what you’re doing. When you come home you just have to kind of get back to it. But that did help in a way. This is a movie about mortality and about who we are and what lives we’re living and who we’re connected to. So I have that experience all day long about what does it mean to be alive, what does it mean to feel things slipping away? When you go home, it’s like, this is what it means to be alive. I have my 16-year-old, he needs this. My 12-year old needs this and my husband needs this and I have to empty the dishwasher and the dogs have to go out in the yard. So all of that stuff actually brings it home because you’re like, “Well, that’s what it’s about.” And in a way that’s a gift.

Julianne Moore, Golden Globe Winner for 'Still Alice,' at the Q & A for the 22nd HIFF US Premiere. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Julianne Moore, Golden Globe Winner for ‘Still Alice,’ at the Q & A for the 22nd HIFF US Premiere. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Audience Question: I found the scene with the butterfly folder so incredibly moving. I was just curious how you approached it and how you felt as you were going through that…you know when you discovered it again.

Wash Westmoreland:  I’ll just set it up by saying that that scene was so crucial in the structure of the movie, because the changes in Alice are very gradual. I think it’s not until you see that scene that you witness the true power of Julianne’s performance to understand how the changes are so dramatic over that period of time that we’ve been following that character. It’s Julie acting with herself…Alice in the past, Alice in the present. The scene really condenses and crystallizes so much about the changes happening in that character in so many ways and the loss that we see.

Julianne Moore: Yeah, it’s so interesting because what we find valuable in certain points in our lives is not necessarily what we’ll find valuable somewhere else. So Alice before she’s more declined believes that she is not going to want to live in this different state. And what you find later you see it with Alec and Ally, and Ally asks, “Do you still want to be here,” and she says “I’m not finished yet. She’s not done with her ice cream…it’s a beautiful metaphor…and she’s not finished yet either with her life. So why would that be any less valuable where she is now? What I loved about that was the juxtaposition. We have an assumption that there is only one way to be when in fact, there are many ways to be and they are all valuable.

Audience Question: Beautiful film. Do you see this film being shown in communities for fund raisers in helping Alzheimer’s research?

Julianne Moore: Yes, hopefully. We have a co-producer on the film who is very closely associated to the Alzheimer’s Association, and she is hoping to work with them to bring to communities in conjunction with the release of the film so that it’s seen regionally and that one of its core audiences is really supported. That’s the hope for it.

Wash Westmoreland:  What the book gave us was this emotional template that’s so strong about how to get through one of the most difficult things that life can throw your way. And I think if people can see this movie in time and take strength from it… maybe they’re dealing with someone in their own family who has Alzheimer’s or another disease and the film inspires them to say, “I want to be Lydia (Alice’s daughter played by Kristen Stewart), I want to be that person whose there for that person,” then we’ve done our job as filmmakers and we’ve done our job with the film.

This article first appeared on Blogcritics.

 

Degas in New Orleans, a Musical World Premiere, Opening Thursday at Bard’s Fisher Center

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Edward Degas’ dancers. Courtesy of the website, Old Art. 

The year 2017 will mark the centennial of Edward Degas‘ death when the renown French Impressionist died in Paris, quite alone and nearly blind. Events celebrating Degas’s life and work are already gearing up. Playwright Rosary O’Neill, and the husband wife team, composer and solo guitarist David Temple and producer/director Deborah Temple are in the forefront celebrating the beloved artist in the World Premiere of the musical Degas in New Orleans which is opening Thursday, December 18th at Bard’s Fisher Center.

Degas is most famous for his paintings, prints, and drawings, and is closely identified with the subject of dance, since more than half of his works depict dancers. He has been associated with Impressionism, though he preferred to characterize himself as a realist. What many Americans and French do not realize about Edgar Degas was that he spent a period of his life in New Orleans, Louisiana, with his brother Rene and his family, staying at the home of his Creole uncle, Michel Musson, on Esplanade Avenue. This dramatic period of his life is the setting of the new musical Degas in New Orleans, written by Rosary O’Neill, with music composed by David Temple. The production, which is beautifully conceived and directed by Deborah Temple, has the honor of being presented by a select group of students in the Red Hook Central School District.

Rosary O'Neill with Degas the green dancer in NOMA (New Orleans). Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Rosary O’Neill with Degas the green dancer in NOMA (New Orleans). Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Degas in New Orleans is about Edgar Degas’ visit to his family who were in a state of crisis after the Civil War and struggling to survive. Degas is swept up in the events of family, the political currents and the cultural changes that are upending the city of New Orleans. He  attempts to give his moral and financial support, but finds the circumstances there more and more troubling as he becomes entranced with Estelle and other family members. He gains solace through painting family; notably there is a niece who loves to practice her dance. As the conflicts grow more desperate in his life with them, he discovers secrets about his sister-in-law, Estelle and his brother Rene. The circumstances which spin beyond his control ultimately break his heart. The production of Degas in New Orleans is in its final rehearsal stages. As you can see from the production photos, it looks to be one more amazing achievement in the careers of the husband and wife team David and Deborah Temple and Rosary O’Neill.

About the composer, playwright, director/producer

David Temple at a solo event. Photo courtesy of David Temple.

David Temple at a solo event. Photo courtesy of David Temple.

David Temple is a noted composer, classical guitarist and faculty member of The Bard College Conservatory of Music. Temple collaborated with Rosary O’Neill and Deborah Temple on the production Broadway or Bust, which was also presented at the Bard Fisher Center a year ago and for which he originated all of its music. Temple is a solo and instrumental composer who has performed globally and whose works are being used for film and television. His CDs may be found online along with his performance schedule and videos of his performance events.

Rosary O’Neill is a noted playwright, whose works have been produced at The Southern Rep, a theatre she founded in New Orleans. Her plays have been published by Samuel French. Some of them have been compiled in three anthologies whose subject is one of the loves of her life, her native New Orleans. She  has written novels and screenplays and has also authored texts on the theater, acting and the dramatic arts. Her most recent published work is non fiction. It is a subject close to her heart and on which she is an expert, New Orleans Mardi Gras which has its roots steeped in the occult and mystical Carnival celebrations of Europe.

Deborah and David Temple, director/producer and composer of 'Degas in New Orleans.' Photo courtesy of the Temples.

Deborah and David Temple, director/producer, and composer of ‘Degas in New Orleans.’ Photo courtesy of the Temples.

Deborah Temple has years of experience producing and directing musical theatre and is well known in upstate New York’s Hudson River Valley circles. For over a decade her dedication and tireless efforts directing and producing talented students in the Red Hook Performing Arts Club with the assistance of friends and community members have garnered the support of all those in the Red Hook Central School District and beyond. Her reputation for high standards in producing quality productions precedes her.  As a long time Red Hook Central School District employee and Performing Art’s Club adviser, she is thrilled to be an integral part of the community. And whether she is aware of this or not, in producing exceptional high school productions she has become an important vehicle for sustaining regional theater in upstate New York, especially in a time when it is increasingly difficult to mount and/or innovate theater productions without incurring massive debts (the budget of a minimalist production could feed 2 families with children for a year).

 Degas in New Orleans. Photo courtesy of Deborah Temple, producer/director.

Tom Bloxham and Mickey Lynch in ‘Degas in New Orleans.’ Production photo courtesy of Deborah Temple, producer/director.

The Cast of Red Hook Performing Arts Club is a group of select, highly talented students whose energy and creativity have inspired them to collaborate with composer David Temple and director Deborah Temple. Together this group of artists have evolved the songs for Degas in New Orleans in “real time,” honing the words and the musical lines to perfection. It is a process all composers use when innovating the musical scores for both opera and regular musical productions. Their dedication to this amazing project is truly remarkable and speaks to their professionalism, work ethic and love of performance.

The cast of the Red Hook Performing Arts Club in rehearsal for Degas in New Orleans. Photo courtesy of Deborah Temple, producer/director.

The cast of the Red Hook Perform(L to R) Lucy Makebish, Elizabeth Lococo and Natalie LeBossier in  ‘Degas in New Orleans.’ Production photo courtesy of Deborah Temple, producer/director.

The production photos indicate the quality of the scenic design, the staging and the sheer beauty of the dramatic rendering thus far created by the director’s artistry and skill. The period costumes and set pieces were generously supplied by Montgomery Place, the Center for Performing Arts Center at Rhinebeck, Bard College, and other local sources.  The Pit Orchestra is made up of Red Hook Central students and teachers.  Production staff, technical support, and set construction staff are a combination of professionals, students, parents, and Red Hook alumni.

 

PERFORMANCES AT BARD FISHER CENTER BLACK-BOX THEATER

Tickets are selling fast. But you can call Bard Fisher Center’s Ticket Office to purchase tickets.

Cast of the Red Hook Performing Arts Club in rehearsal for Degas in New Orleans. Photo courtesy of Deborah Temple.

Trevor Kowalsky as Degas in ‘Degas in New Orleans.’ Production photo courtesy of Deborah Temple.

WHEN:  THURSDAY, December 18 and FRIDAY, December 19 at 7:00 p.m.

Tickets are $10.00/$8.00 students and seniors available in advance for Thursday and Friday night performances at the Fisher Center Box Office, 845-758-7900/6822 and sold at the door. Click on the dates (December 18, December 19) in the calendar for tickets.

PERFORMANCES AT RED HOOK CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

WHEN:  SATURDAY, December 20 at 7:00 p.m. and SUNDAY, December 21 at 3:00 p.m. at Red Hook Central High School.

Tickets are $10.00/$8.00 students and seniors. Tickets for the Saturday and Sunday performances will be available at the door at Red Hook High School.

 

Degas in New Orleans: A Musical World Premiere Presented at Bard’s Fisher Center

Rosary O'Neill with Degas the green dancer in NOMA (New Orleans). Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Rosary O’Neill with Degas’ Dancer in Green in NOMA (New Orleans). Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Producer and director Deborah Temple and the Red Hook Performing Arts Club are presenting a world premiere of the new musical, Degas in New Orleans.  The play is written by New Orleans native Rosary Hartel O’Neill. It has been set to music by local composer David Temple.

Degas in New Orleans, tells the story of the French painter Edgar Degas’ five-month stay with his family in the Crescent City shortly after the Civil War.  It reveals much about the post-war South, political and ethnic strife unique to Louisiana, the dynamics of a family in its social descent — as well as the passions of unrequited love, and the struggling vision of a great artist at a crossroads in his life and career.

The historic marker which indicates the house where Degas' family lived and where he visited in New Orleans. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The historic marker which indicates the house where Degas’ family lived and where he visited in New Orleans. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

A select group of students in the Red Hook Central School District have embraced an extraordinary artistic challenge: to transform a drama based on a life-changing time in a famous painter’s life into an original musical and make it performance ready for a state-of-the-art stage at the incomparable Fisher Center. The project was initiated by long time Red Hook Central School District employee and the Performing Art’s Club adviser, Deborah Temple. Deborah Temple has worked alongside playwright Rosary Hartel O’Neill at Omega Institute during summer writing seminars for a number of seasons and their collaboration at Omega inspired their working together on two of O’Neill’s plays: Broadway or Bust and Degas in New Orleans.

Neither O’Neill nor Deborah Temple are new to the theater. Temple has almost two decades of experience in direction and production. O’Neill ran her own theater, Southern Rep, in New Orleans. She has authored over twenty-two plays, twenty of which are published by Samuel French. And her plays may be found in three anthologies. She has written textbooks on the dramatic arts, as well as novels and screenplays. Her book about New Orleans Mardi Gras has been receiving notices as a fascinating account of the secrets of  Mardi Gras Carnival Krewes. O’Neill, who now resides in Rhinecliff, proposed to have Degas in New Orleans transformed into a musical, knowing of David Temple’s extensive musical gifts. The Performing Arts Club has stepped up with its energy and talent to make the project a reality.

The Degas home on Esplanade Avenue, now converted into a noted Bed and Breakfast. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

The Degas home on Esplanade Avenue, now converted into a noted Bed and Breakfast. Photo by Carole Di Tosti

Composer and classical guitarist David Temple is renown as a solo performer and instrumental composer. His works are played internationally for film and television. He composed music for O’Neill’s Broadway or Bust which premiered in November 2013, also at the Fisher Center. Having collaborated with O’Neill he was excited about this new project. Songs for Degas in New Orleans were created in “real time.” Sketches of the new pieces were originated during the actual rehearsals of scenes, designed not only for specific characters, but for the vocal capabilities of the actors. This is one of the finest ways to originate and compose musical works by collaborating with the singers/actors. Douglas Moore in his operatic composition, Ballad of Baby Doe created the music and worked with singers to test out the musical waters and vocal ranges elaborating and changing the score and enhancing it.

Likewise, with the Temples these student/actors have been refining their character portrayals, running lines and learning original songs in an ongoing developmental process that has been organic and alive.  The final result is a celebration of the creative process. Their effort and dedication to a project that has demanded ingenuity, acting craft, brilliance and flexibility is nothing short of astonishing. To say that these highly talented students have embraced a professional work ethic wholeheartedly is an understatement.

Period costumes and set pieces were generously supplied by Montgomery Place, the Center for Performing Arts Center at Rhinebeck, Bard College, and other local sources.  The Pit Orchestra is made up of Red Hook Central students and teachers.  Production staff, technical support, and set construction staff are a combination of professionals, students, parents, and Red Hook alumni.

David Temple with his guitar. Photo taken from the David Temple website.

David Temple with his guitar. Photo taken from the David Temple website.

Click links below for more information.

PERFORMANCES AT BARD COLLEGE FISHER CENTER BLACK-BOX THEATER

WHEN:  THURSDAY, December 18 and FRIDAY, December 19 at 7:00 p.m.

Tickets are $10.00/$8.00 students and seniors available in advance for Thursday and Friday night performances at the Fisher Center Box Office, 758-7900 and sold at the door.

PERFORMANCES AT RED HOOK CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

WHEN:  SATURDAY, December 20 at 7:00 p.m. and SUNDAY, December 21 at 3:00 p.m. at Red Hook Central High School.

Tickets are $10.00/$8.00 students and seniors. Tickets for the Saturday and Sunday performances will be available at the door at Red Hook High School.

Bard Fisher Center Website

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